Now is the time to tell a culturally inclusive, globally significant human and environmental history of Australia. We like to call it, Australia’s Epic Story.

Australia has been shaped as a nation by its natural, historic and Indigenous heritage. To adapt successfully to future changes, we must dramatically improve our understanding of Australia’s past.

We are undertaking research that will safeguard our national heritage, transform research culture, connect with communities and inform policy.

#EPICAUSTRALIA

Retracing our ancient routes

The size of the first population of people needed to arrive, survive and thrive in what is now Australia has been revealed in two studies by CABAH researchers. We know that people have been in Australia for a very long time — at least for the past 50,000 years, and […]

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Koala Extinctions Past, Present, and Future

Koalas are one of the most recognised symbols of Australian wildlife. But the tree-living marsupial koala is not doing well throughout much of its range in eastern Australia. Ranging as far north as Cairns in Queensland, to as far west as Kangaroo Island in South Australia, the koala’s biggest threats […]

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Stepping back into the deep past at Lake Mungo

With windswept lunettes and often stormy skies, the Lake Mungo landscape is a spectacular setting for a journey into the deep past. It’s also one of Australia’s most significant areas of cultural and archaeological interest – a treasure trove of clues to the lives of the people who came before […]

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Extinction domino effect linked to climate change

Environmental changes increase the risk of an ‘extinction domino effect’ that could annihilate all life on Earth, according to new research. Researchers, including CABAH Chief Investigator Professor Corey Bradshaw, simulated 2,000 ‘virtual Earths’ linking animal and plant species. Using sophisticated modelling, they subjected the virtual Earths to catastrophic environmental changes, including runaway […]

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Rewilding Australia

Sometimes the best way to conserve biodiversity is to stand back and let wild animals do the hard work of ecological management. In December 2012, the Copenhagen Post reported a discovery that marked a historic turning point for nature in Denmark: the first confirmed record of a wolf in the […]

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Mapping the journeys of Australia’s first people

A ‘treasure map’ of island locations has been developed to identify the stepping-stones Aboriginal people used to get to Australia. The mapping work undertaken by CABAH Associate Investigator Shimona Kealy from The Australian National University (ANU) plots the potential routes taken tens of thousands of years ago by Australia’s first […]

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Deadly dining out

Deadly dining out Hover over or click on the coloured fish and shellfish below to find out more about what is hidden in a midden By Shane Ingrey I know some spots around Sydney where you can look at a dinner plate thousands of years old. Places where family feeds […]

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Getting to the bottom of 200,000 years of history

ALMOST 20 metres of sediment from the bed of a Northern Territory lagoon with, the potential to unlock vital clues to our environment and human history, have been retrieved by CABAH researchers. Girraween Lagoon, near Darwin, is a significant Aboriginal site and gained a place in modern Australian popular culture […]

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Play our Accidental Time Traveller game

Accidental Time Traveller Fight megafauna, brave the elements, meet the locals and test your survival skills in a two-minute mini adventure. Choose your path – how long will you survive?   

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ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage

Now is the time to tell a culturally inclusive, globally significant environmental history of Australia We like to call it Australia’s Epic Story. Australia has been shaped as a nation by its natural, historic and Indigenous heritage. To adapt successfully to future changes, we must dramatically improve our understanding of Australia’s past. The ARC Centre of Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH) will undertake research that will safeguard our national heritage, transform research culture, connect with communities and inform policy. By tracking the natural and human history of Australia, Papua New Guinea and eastern Indonesia, we will be able to fill vast gulfs of knowledge to help us protect our national assets. Opened at Parliament House, Canberra, on 22 June 2017, the centre is funded by a $33.75 million grant from the Australian Research Council, $1 million from the NSW Government, and $11 million from participating universities, museums, and organisations. The funding will support around 40 new research positions and more than 50 new research students over the 7-year life of the Centre. CABAH will be at the forefront of discovery and education, inspiring Australian children to engage in science and connecting with the broader Australian and global community through a comprehensive outreach program. We will help build Australia’s research capacity by equipping future generations of researchers with a range of interdisciplinary skills, and implement initiatives to nurture the careers of Indigenous and female researchers. We’re building a impressive online resource to tell Australia’s Epic Story. Want to be kept up to date with our blockbuster discoveries? Like our page!
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
“These records and traditional knowledge systems ... are testimony to hundreds of generations of connection.”

Researchers, including CABAH Associate Investigator Peter Veth, have worked with Kwini Traditional Owners and Rangers from Balanggarra Aboriginal Corporation to confirm Aboriginal people lived in the northern Kimberley 50,000 years ago.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage shared a post.
Seeing a koala in the wild is always exciting, and Brittany says seeing this mother and joey at Burleigh Head National Park on the Gold Coast was "the coolest thing that's ever happened to me".

Keep an eye out for the joey's cute wink!

Have you been lucky enough to see any koalas recently?

🎥 Brittany Dixon (@colourlane)
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ABC Sydney
Seeing a koala in the wild is always exciting, and Brittany says seeing this mother and joey at Burleigh Head National Park on the Gold Coast was "the coolest thing that's ever happened to me". Keep an eye out for the joey's cute wink! Have you been lucky enough to see any koalas recently? 🎥 Brittany Dixon (@colourlane)
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage shared a post.
🐨 Should we be doing more to protect the koala in NSW? 🐨

An Upper House inquiry will start today into the state's koala habitats and population.

Nature Conservation Foundation chief executive Chris Gambian said a joint submission with 11 other environmental groups called on the Government to adopt stronger laws.

"Our politicians in NSW really have a simple choice that they have to make," he said.

"They can be the generation that sees the rapid decline of koala numbers and possibly the extinction of koalas in NSW, or they can be the generation that decides that we are going to do the urgent and necessary work to protect their habitats and restore native forests."
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage shared a post.
Beautiful. 🎶👏🏾

Young voices all the way from Hope Vale, in Far North Queensland, filling the Sydney Opera House with songs in Guugu Yimithirr language.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
NITV
Hopevale children's choir & Aunty Lillian Bowen perform in the Guugu Yimithirr language at Sydney's Opera house.

Twitter


Archaeology site sheds light on Aboriginal Australians 50,000 years ago, according to research led by CABAH's @peteveth alongside Kwini Traditional Owners and Rangers from Balanggarra Aboriginal Corporation.
https://t.co/LfbSuarwHU… via @NITV @uwa @arc_gov_au https://t.co/Xe0gVYZ15c

Big shout out to all the CABAH crew who took part in Science Week events. Here are some of them in action getting hands-on to communicate our research.
@arc_gov_au https://t.co/2wReVSEVOx

Researchers, including CABAH's Bert Roberts, have analysed bat droppings and moisture in a cave in North Vietnam, finding evidence of groups of people living there back more than 40,000 years.
https://t.co/W6NHi35rGd
@CAS_UOW @uowresearch https://t.co/rfZ64V5MNN

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WILDLIFE

How has Australia’s wildlife responded to climate, landscape change and human impact over thousands of years?

[Image by Georgia Steytler]

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TIME

Time is fundamental to understanding the story of Australia’s natural and Indigenous history and heritage.

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People

Human history is written in the land. Delve into the lives of the first Australians, by looking back 60,000+ years, and ponder how our past informs our future.

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Landscapes

Australia is a land of ragged mountains and sweeping plains, shaped by droughts and flooding rains. How did the landscapes we see around us come to be and how have they changed?

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Climate

Reconstructing climate to better understand the drivers and impacts of past and future change.

[Image: Sonia Leber and David Chesworth]

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Models

Combining the diverse results from other themes, using statistical and computational methods to quantify uncertainty and model complex interactions.

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