Now is the time to tell a culturally inclusive, globally significant human and environmental history of Australia. We like to call it, Australia’s Epic Story.

Australia has been shaped as a nation by its natural, historic and Indigenous heritage. To adapt successfully to future changes, we must dramatically improve our understanding of Australia’s past.

We are undertaking research that will safeguard our national heritage, transform research culture, connect with communities and inform policy.

What lies beneath — submerged sites could help tell the story of Australia’s first people

The story of Australia’s first people begins many tens of thousands of years ago. Archaeological evidence suggests people arrived on the Australian continent up to 65,000 years ago. And many Aboriginal communities across Northern Australia have strong oral histories of ancestral beings arriving from the north. We are working with […]

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This rainforest was once a grassland savanna maintained by Aboriginal people

If you go to the Surrey Hills of northwest Tasmania, you’ll see a temperate rainforest dominated by sprawling trees with genetic links going back millions of years. It’s a forest type many consider to be ancient “wilderness”. But this landscape once looked very different. The only hints are a handful […]

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We were what we ate — clues to the survival of our earliest ancestors in teeth fossils

Analysis of ancient teeth has unlocked surprising new insights into the ability of early humans to adapt to new and extreme environments. The breakthrough came from a study of fossil teeth found during archaeological excavations of caves and rock shelters on two islands in a region known as Wallacea. Analysis […]

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Why we need to care about a 2℃ change in temperature

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states that without a substantial decrease in our use of fossil fuels, we are on track for a global average increase of 2℃ in the next few decades, with extremes of between 3 to 6℃ at higher latitudes. But […]

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Looking at past climates to understand the present — and predict the future

As we grapple with the reality of climate change and imagine what it will be like to live in a warmer world, CABAH researchers are looking for answers to some big questions in some surprising places. For the past hundred thousand years or so, the continent has been much cooler […]

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65,000-year-old plant remains show the earliest Australians spent plenty of time cooking

Australia’s first people ate a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, nuts and other plant foods, many of which would have taken considerable time and knowledge to prepare, according to our analysis of charred plant remains from a site dating back to 65,000 years ago.

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Ancient Antarctic ice melt increased sea levels by 3+ metres – and it could happen again

Rising ocean temperatures drove the melting of Antarctic ice sheets and caused extreme sea level rise more than 100,000 years ago, a new international study shows. Mass melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet was a major cause of high sea levels during a period known as the Last Interglacial […]

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On Country with the Rosny mob — creating gateways between the past and the future

Spending time on Country on Tasmania’s rugged east coast gave a group of young Indigenous students the opportunity to reconnect to culture and share knowledge of science. The senior students from Rosny College, in Hobart, forged deep and lasting connections during the recent three-day camp aimed at creating a fusion […]

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People, climate, and water supply all played a role in the extinction of Australia’s megafauna

Imagine trying to solve a mystery that is tens of thousands of years old. There are no witnesses still alive, clues are scarce, and even the evidence that does exist is sometimes of questionable reliability. This has been a challenge facing scientists trying to piece together the factors that led […]

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ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage

Now is the time to tell a culturally inclusive, globally significant environmental history of Australia We like to call it Australia’s Epic Story. Australia has been shaped as a nation by its natural, historic and Indigenous heritage. To adapt successfully to future changes, we must dramatically improve our understanding of Australia’s past. The ARC Centre of Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH) will undertake research that will safeguard our national heritage, transform research culture, connect with communities and inform policy. By tracking the natural and human history of Australia, Papua New Guinea and eastern Indonesia, we will be able to fill vast gulfs of knowledge to help us protect our national assets. Opened at Parliament House, Canberra, on 22 June 2017, the centre is funded by a $33.75 million grant from the Australian Research Council, $1 million from the NSW Government, and $11 million from participating universities, museums, and organisations. The funding will support around 40 new research positions and more than 50 new research students over the 7-year life of the Centre. CABAH will be at the forefront of discovery and education, inspiring Australian children to engage in science and connecting with the broader Australian and global community through a comprehensive outreach program. We will help build Australia’s research capacity by equipping future generations of researchers with a range of interdisciplinary skills, and implement initiatives to nurture the careers of Indigenous and female researchers. We’re building a impressive online resource to tell Australia’s Epic Story. Want to be kept up to date with our blockbuster discoveries? Like our page!
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
It mightn't look like much, but this patch of scrubland is described as the "most incredible treasure chest in the world" as it is home to the oldest known mineral grains on Earth.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
The discovery of submerged archaeological sites off the coast of northern WA could provide vital clues about how Australia's first people lived and adapted to the environment.

“Further exploration could unearth similar cultural relics and help us better understand the life of the people who were so connected to these areas of lands which are now underwater,” says Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation CEO Peter Jeffries.

Learn more: bit.ly/2NQKMfW
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage
Sago palm is a staple food source of the FOI people of Lake Kutubu, in PNG.

This image was captured by CABAH’s Simon Haberle, from the ANU, during fieldwork to reconstruct past climates to understand the impact of people and climate have had in ecosystems through time.

Image credit: Simon Haberle

#paleoecology #research #environment

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The discovery of submerged archaeological sites off the coast of northern WA could provide vital clues about how Australia's first people lived and adapted to the environment.
@DeepSeaCountry @Flinders @jcu @arc_gov_au @SeanUlm
https://t.co/9ikRqBKNWJ
#epicaustralia https://t.co/2UIJPhdhRk

Here's the link to this marvellous marsupials seminar:
https://t.co/iy3npBoYEb https://t.co/hifaGrVPeO
ConservationBytes @conservbytes
Our 8 July #EcoEvo Seminar @Flinders will feature A/Prof @WeisbeckerLab: ‘Marvellous #marsupials: from deep-time morphology to population #biogeography”. As before, we will also live-stream the event (link to follow) @cabahCoE #ecology #evolution #EvoDevo https://t.co/gr9mh2XuD4

Citizen scientist strikes gold and makes major 460-million-year-old fossil find https://t.co/aX3zfZGPOn

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WILDLIFE

How has Australia’s wildlife responded to climate, landscape change and human impact over thousands of years?

[Image by Georgia Steytler]

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TIME

Time is fundamental to understanding the story of Australia’s natural and Indigenous history and heritage.

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People

Human history is written in the land. Delve into the lives of the first Australians, by looking back 60,000+ years, and ponder how our past informs our future.

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Landscapes

Australia is a land of ragged mountains and sweeping plains, shaped by droughts and flooding rains. How did the landscapes we see around us come to be and how have they changed?

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Climate

Reconstructing climate to better understand the drivers and impacts of past and future change.

[Image: Sonia Leber and David Chesworth]

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Models

Combining the diverse results from other themes, using statistical and computational methods to quantify uncertainty and model complex interactions.

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